Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, WindowsHayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Chair, Facade, BeamHayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Windows, BeamHayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Living Room, TableHayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - More Images+ 27

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Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, Windows, Facade
© Shigeo Ogawa

Text description provided by the architects. A villa fronting a private drive is a three-minute walk from Isshiki Beach. The Hayama area was a fishing village up until the Edo Period, but resort construction began there in the Meiji Era for the Emperor, Imperial lineage, and renowned people. Houses line the narrow lanes remaining from fishing village times. Since the property steps downhill from the north to south, southside properties are in plain view from the north.

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, Windows, Facade, Chair, Courtyard
© Shigeo Ogawa
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Image 27 of 32
Structure 3D
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Chair, Facade, Beam
© Shigeo Ogawa

The layout settled on five separate volumes that were not imposing on adjacent houses. volumes are placed around a courtyard hosting the swimming pool and opening southward to the ocean. The building heights generally align with interior functionality but are set in relation to neighboring residences and the roof pitch is adjusted accordingly. The single-pitched roof of the Dining volume is brought to a low building height for the yard of the house to the northwest. A steep-pitched roof for the Living volume affords both courtyard privacy and ocean views for the house close to the northeast property boundary. The roof of the Bedroom volume is pitched downward towards the courtyard for the healthy maintenance of the large camphor tree.

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Windows, Beam
© Shigeo Ogawa
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Interior Photography, Living Room, Table, Beam, Chair, Bedroom
© Shigeo Ogawa
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Image 30 of 32
Plan
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, Beam
© Shigeo Ogawa
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Image 32 of 32
Section

The gaps between the volumes comprise corridors leading to the periphery from the courtyard and provide passages of light and breezes. The connector role between volumes belongs to the pergola with galvanized steel louvers. The pergola covers the southside decking of the Dining volume to buffer the environment and fits between the buildings as shading for the skylights.

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, Facade
© Shigeo Ogawa
Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography
© Shigeo Ogawa

The client’s wish at the initial planning stage was to build a simple hut, but the scale of the villa increased over the design phase as functionality increased. Nonetheless, the complex of small buildings harmonizes like a village to blend with the vista of Isshiki’s seaside landscape with deference towards its neighbors.

Hayama Huts / KEY OPERATION INC. / ARCHITECTS - Exterior Photography, Facade, Windows, Courtyard
© Shigeo Ogawa

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