‘Design spaces better for heat’: UNL architects want to build heat-resistant spaces in Nebraska

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Outside the University of Nebraska at Lincoln student center, a fountain spews water and students nap in hammocks under the shade of trees.”These things come together to provide both a beautiful space, but also a space that actually makes people feel really comfortable in the area,” said Salvador Lindquist, assistant professor at the UNL College of Architecture.Nebraska temperatures have risen more than 1.6 degrees since the start of the 20th century, although University of Nebraska at Lincoln architects in the 1960s may not have known that their designs would help mitigate the effects of modern hotter days. “There’s things that we’ve done as designers for a long time that work, right?” Lindquist said.You might not think twice about a shady walkway outside the student center while you hurry to class, but the wide overhang can protect you from the elements, especially the sun. “So if you’re in the shade, that’s 30 degrees cooler than if you’re in direct sun,” Lindquist said.Lindquist and his students are drawing up blueprints for a more heat-conscious urban experience. They are focused on “thermal comfort,” or how the body feels physically in a space.”I mean, it’s going to get worse, right? Like, it’s not going to get any better any sooner. And so we need to start preparing,” Lindquist said. “We can feel the change is happening and we need to think about how our landscapes, our urban landscapes can effectively counteract this rising heat.”Lindquist hopes to see cities build cooler landscapes into their budgets. A brighter future, he said, may just start by building shadier spaces.”There’s a lot of things that we can be doing to design spaces better for heat that we aren’t currently doing,” Lindquist said. Get the latest headlines from KETV NewsWatch 7

Outside the University of Nebraska at Lincoln student center, a fountain spews water and students nap in hammocks under the shade of trees.

“These things come together to provide both a beautiful space, but also a space that actually makes people feel really comfortable in the area,” said Salvador Lindquist, assistant professor at the UNL College of Architecture.

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Nebraska temperatures have risen more than 1.6 degrees since the start of the 20th century, although University of Nebraska at Lincoln architects in the 1960s may not have known that their designs would help mitigate the effects of modern hotter days.

“There’s things that we’ve done as designers for a long time that work, right?” Lindquist said.

You might not think twice about a shady walkway outside the student center while you hurry to class, but the wide overhang can protect you from the elements, especially the sun.

“So if you’re in the shade, that’s 30 degrees cooler than if you’re in direct sun,” Lindquist said.

Lindquist and his students are drawing up blueprints for a more heat-conscious urban experience. They are focused on “thermal comfort,” or how the body feels physically in a space.

“I mean, it’s going to get worse, right? Like, it’s not going to get any better any sooner. And so we need to start preparing,” Lindquist said. “We can feel the change is happening and we need to think about how our landscapes, our urban landscapes can effectively counteract this rising heat.”

Lindquist hopes to see cities build cooler landscapes into their budgets. A brighter future, he said, may just start by building shadier spaces.

“There’s a lot of things that we can be doing to design spaces better for heat that we aren’t currently doing,” Lindquist said.

Get the latest headlines from KETV NewsWatch 7

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